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Elon Musk: ‘Twitter usage is at an all-time high’ after the acqusition

At the conclusion of the second quarter, there were 237.8 million daily active users on Twitter.

According to an internal memo acquired by The Verge, the number of daily active users on Twitter increased by 20% in the first week of Elon Musk’s ownership. This statistic may allay worries of a mass exodus from the network.

According to the most recent financial report before Musk took Twitter private, there were 237.8 million monetizable daily active users as of the end of the second quarter.

According to an internal document sent to the sales team for discussions with advertisers who are hesitant about their position on the network, daily active user growth achieved “all-time highs” and exceeded 250 million in the first full week of Musk’s private ownership, The Verge claims, citing the internal document.

Following Musk’s acquisition, a number of well-known people made the decision to quit Twitter, including Gigi Hadid, Sara Bareilles, Shonda Rhimes, Ken Olin, and others.


Although this is the case, Musk said on Sunday that user counts “had climbed dramatically throughout the globe since the agreement was announced.”

Musk tweeted, “And these are really early days. “Twitter will be essential since it becomes by far the most trustworthy source of truth.”

Twitter “aspires to be the most recognized marketing platform in the world that promotes your brand and expands your organization,” the billionaire has said to ensure advertisers that the site would not become a “free-for-all hellscape.”

Elon Musk’s Twitter Requests Some Layoffs to Reappear

The Elon Musk era got off to a shaky start this weekend, with the remaining employees having to postpone the rollout of the new $8 blue check system and management pleading with some recently laid-off workers to come back to work.

For the daring billionaire tech baron conqueror Musk, today was meant to be the day of the magnificent release of the new $20 premium membership blue-check system on Twitter, which would proudly welcome the new age of Musk’s anti-woke free speech genius and provide gobs of new cash streams to the internet tycoon.

And Musk’s powerful hammer hung over those Twitter workers, warning them that if they fell short of his immaculate plan, there would be no compassion. Employees working on the project were informed on Sunday that they must implement the feature by November 7 or they would be fired, according to a story from The Verge published last Sunday.

Let’s see how things are going at Musk’s gorgeous new Twitter after the purge.

Of course, only two days after that directive last Sunday, the $20 blue cheque was reduced to an $8 blue check, I assume because Stephen King made fun of Musk.

On Saturday, the new $7.99/month blue-check subscription was released on iOS, but several customers complained that the blue check itself was not appearing for them.

In a hasty move to prevent any last-minute electoral fraud, Twitter quickly announced Sunday morning that they would be postponing the launch of the $8 per month service. CNN said that the delay would be “till after the midterm elections.”

But guys, this may simply be Musk pulling another Pee-wee Herman. “I planned to do that,” she said because the rollout was failing miserably, as the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Twitter Inc.’s first significant product change under new owner Elon Musk “had a setback as a planned software upgrade to enable some subscribers to purchase blue check marks for their accounts led to considerable confusion when it failed to materialize for most users.”

“Users reported having trouble activating the upgrade. A top Twitter manager said that initial trials of the new service included upgrades for select users.

Esther Crawford, a (remaining) Twitter product manager, explains this in the paragraph above by noting, “We are testing and pushing changes in real-time, so some people may see us making modifications.” On private Slack channels, though, the remaining execs are telling a very different tale.

The platform obviously needs improvement, and NY Times podcaster Casey Newton has internal Slack conversations showing Twitter administrators attempting to rehire dismissed staff with their tails between their legs.

Direct remarks from a representative of Twitter “Sorry to @- everyone on the weekend, but I wanted to let you know that we have the chance to ask the people that were dropped whether they would return. By 4 PM PST on Sunday, I need to put together names and explanations, according to the message.

I’ll conduct some investigation, but if any of you have spoken to someone who may return and who we believe would be able to assist us, please nominate them tomorrow before 4 p.m. We could probably use some assistance from iOS and Android.

Although Bloomberg thinks that just “dozens of staff” have accepted the opportunity to be reinstated, the company has confirmed that laid-off Twitter employees have been invited back.

However, Twitter still presents a rather disorganized image with this decision-making. According to Bloomberg, “several of those who are being invited to return was laid off by mistake.” Others were fired before management realized their labor and expertise could be needed to develop the brand-new features Musk wants.

It goes without saying that this mayhem occurs as a result of a massive flight of advertisers from Twitter, Musk banning popular accounts for poking fun at him, and his asking people to pay for a blue check after years of using the word as a slur.

It doesn’t seem realistic that the $8 blue check will appeal to many customers outside of a certain group of white, male Elon fanboys. However, it may be more fun to watch Twitter collapse under Elon Musk’s leadership while paying nothing.

With inputs from FOX Business & SFIST

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Written by Alex Bruno

Freelance space writer Alex Bruno specializes in covering China's quickly expanding space industry. In 2021, he started writing for SpaceXMania. He also contributes to publications including SpaceNews, IEEE Spectrum, National Geographic, Sky & Telescope, and New Scientist. When Alex was a small child, he first experienced the space bug after seeing Voyager photographs of alien planets in our solar system. When not in space, Alex likes to go trail jogging in the Finnish countryside.

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